Species at risk

Butternut trees are endangered in Canada and there is one on the Homewood grounds.According to the Schlegel’s own environmental impact studies (pdf), there have been eight plant species identified in the affected area that are nationally, provincially, or regionally significant:

  • Butternut – endangered (probability of extinction or extirpation in the wild is at least 50%)
  • Canada Waterleaf – native, present, and provincially or otherwise rare
  • Canadian Redbud – native, present, and provincially or otherwise rare
  • Common Hackberry – native, present, and provincially or otherwise rare
  • Common Hop-tree – threatened (capable of becoming extinct, extirpated or critically endangered in a very short period of time)
  • Dwarf Clearweed – native, present, and provincially or otherwise rare
  • Giant Solomon’s Seal – native, present, and provincially or otherwise rare
  • Kentucky Coffee-Tree – threatened (capable of becoming extinct, extirpated or critically endangered in a very short period of time)

Eastern wood-peweeThere are nine significant bird species known within 10km of the affected area, of which three are either commonly found in the Homewood grounds or have suitable breeding habitat there:

  • Chimney Swift – threatened
  • Eastern Wood-Pewee – special concern
  • Red-headed Woodpecker – threatened

Five significant reptile species are known to be present:

  • Eastern Milksnake – special concern, regionally significant
  • Northern Map Turtle – special concern, regionally significant
  • Northern Ribbonsnake – special concern, regionally significant
  • Snapping Turtle – special concern
  • Western Chorus Frog – threatened

Four significant butterfly species were identified to be present or have suitable habitat in the Homewood grounds:

  • Giant Swallowtail – imperiled, regionally significant
  • Monarch – special concern, regionally significant
  • Tawny Emperor – imperiled, regionally significant
  • West Virginia White – vulnerable, regionally significant

The long-tailed weasel is regionally significant and occurs on the Homewood propertyFive significant mammal species are also known to be present and/or have suitable habitat:

  • Hairy-tailed Mole – regionally significant
  • Little Brown Bat – endangered, regionally significant
  • Long-tailed Weasel – regionally significant
  • Tricoloured Bat – endangered, regionally significant
  • Woodland Jumping Mouse – regionally significant

With all of these 25 at-risk species and their habitat having been identified as being present in the Homewood environmental impact studies, it highlights just how important the property is to environmental conservation.  We feel strongly that any development plan approvals need to be considered with the utmost care and caution.

 

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